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Thank a Girl Scout Leader Today…

…and EVERY day!

The month of April is National Volunteer Month, the week of April 12-18 was 2015’s National Volunteer Week, and today is Girl Scout Leader Day!

Leader-Day-2015-patch

All the women and men across the country and across the world who give their time to selflessly guide and mentor millions of young women, we here at the Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta want to say THANK YOU! All the work that goes into planning and executing weekly meetings, camping weekends, community service events, and ALL the unseen work that you do has not gone unnoticed. You are helping these girls realize their goals and become leaders themselves one day. Did you know that approximately 80 percent of female entrepreneurs were once Girl Scouts? So keep doing what you’re doing- making a HUGE difference in the world!

Check out these vintage photos of some Girl Scout leaders throughout the years:

2015-04-22 10.42.22

from the 1968 Official Dress Uniforms catalog

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from the 1968 Official Dress Uniforms catalog

from the 1974-75 Girl Scout Catalog

from the 1974-75 Girl Scout Catalog

from the 1986-87 Girl Scout Catalog

from the 1986-87 Girl Scout Catalog

Happy November, Everyone!

girl-scout-thanks-badgeWith November comes the season of pausing to give thanks. What better way for a Girl Scout to show her appreciation and to acknowledge those who have given outstanding service to Girl Scouting than the Thanks Badge? The Thanks Badge has been in existence since the very first days of Girl Scouting in 1912. The first image of it appeared as an illustration in the 1916 edition of the Girl Scout handbook, How Girls Can Help Their Country. The design of the Thanks Badge has only been changed once in its entire history and even then it was a tiny little change: the triangle in the center of the cloverleaf design was added in 1917.

The Thanks Badge was originally designed to be given to those outside of the Girl Scout organization to show thanks and appreciation for their promotion of the Girl Scout way. Its original colors were enameled in white, red, and green. In 1926 a second Thanks Badge was produced, intended for adult Girl Scout members inside the organization. It looked exactly the same, but was enameled in white, red, and blue like the one pictured here. The green version of the badge was discontinued in 1956 when a special Certificate of Appreciation for non-members of the organization took its place.

To this day, to be presented with a Girl Scout Thanks Badge is a great honor. To even be considered for it, one has to be nominated, have 4 letters of endorsement written on their behalf, have their nomination submitted to and approved by numerous committees, and finally get approval by the Board of Directors. It is no easy task and is held in the highest esteem by those who receive it. Thanks Badges are so cherished by their recipients that it has even been hard to find one to add to the Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta Archives Collection! Thanks Badges have been and will continue to be handed down for generations within Girl Scouting families.

So, even though you can’t just hand your cherished troop leader or Girl Scout volunteer a Thanks Badge, won’t you take the time to give thanks and show your appreciation and gratitude for her this November? Pause and show her that all she has done for you and your fellow Scouts has not gone unnoticed. Give thanks! Show her you care.

 

 

Yay for Volunteers

Volunteer Patch in the Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta Archives

This week has been a celebration of our volunteers, and today is celebrated as Leader’s Day! Girl Scout Leader’s Day, April 22, honors all the volunteers who work as leaders and mentors in partnership with girls. Girls, their families, and communities should find a special way to thank their adult Girl Scout volunteers.

The first Girl Scout Leaders Day was held in April 1982. It was originally created to celebrate the contributions of adult volunteers who put in many hours of hard work with the girls. However, it’s grown to also include all the other volunteers that help out with troops, such as parent volunteers, community members, and anyone who impacts the lives of girls in troops.

We would love to hear the ways that our leaders have been thanked. How did you thank your daughter’s leader, or what type of presents did you receive as a leader? Any memorable tokens that you remember? Please share!