Blog Archives

Wrapping up 2014 with Girl Scouts…

The year is quickly coming to a close! Have you gotten all your shopping done? No, we haven’t either… But more importantly, do you have enough tissue and wrapping paper? Recently, while going through the archives, trying to find some more cool stuff to take pictures of and share with everyone, I came across some Girl Scout wrapping paper and fabric!  I’m not sure what year the wrapping paper is from, but it’s at least pre-2010 when the logo was updated to give the first girl profile bangs, as well as some other subtle changes. The first wrapping paper I found is an all purpose design and can really be used any time of the year:2014-11-19 13.17.54The next paper I found is more of a holiday theme with the green and gold of the official GSUSA membership pins and the Daisy pins combined with the red background and added pop of blue of the World Association pins. This paper dates from somewhere between 1993 when the current version of the Daisy membership pin was introduced and 2010 when the current girls’ profile logo was introduced:

2014-11-19 13.17.10Another charming way to wrap presents is with fabric! That way, the wrapping itself is part of the gift! Especially if the gift is for someone who sews or is crafty. This classic Girl Scout fabric is from 1959, but if you can’t get your hands on any vintage cloth, there are many current styles out there as well:

2014-11-19 13.19.29

Click on the above image for a closer view and then get out there and get to wrapping!

Advertisements

Girl Scout Dolls Through The Years

Dolls are a hugely popular collectible item and Girl Scout dolls are certainly no exception. In 1920, the first known commercially made Girl Scout doll was offered for sale through The American Girl, the official magazine of Girl Scouts, published from 1917 until 1979. Many different sizes and styles of Girl Scout dolls have been produced over the years: Brownie uniformed, Intermediate and Senior uniformed, and even adult or leader dolls; and although their popularity has waxed and waned throughout the decades, Girl Scout dolls are still going strong.

Girl Scout Dolls

Girl Scout dolls, circa 1950s, from the GSGATL Archives collection; each approx. 6-8″ tall

The official Girl Scout doll of today is made by Adora and is an 18” doll similar in style to the popular doll, American Girl (not to be confused with the Girl Scout publication, The American Girl). Many Girl Scout themed dolls and uniforms can be bought across the world, but only the official Adora doll licensed by Girl Scouts of USA (pictured below) can be found at your local council Badge and Sash Store  or through any council’s online store.

Adora Girl Scouts

The newest doll to officially join Girl Scouts as of July 2014 is fashion icon herself, Barbie! She wears the contemporary uniform of today’s girls: her sash and a crisp white shirt, but pink, rather than khaki bottoms. Hey, it’s Barbie… what would she do without her signature pink?

The Girl Scout Barbie doll is manufactured as a blonde, brunette, or African-American, as are most versions of the Barbie Doll, demonstrating how Barbie’s broad diversity is a perfect fit with the Girl Scouts of USA.

barbie scout

If you have any questions regarding Girl Scout dolls that we have in our collection at the GSGATL Archives, please don’t hesitate to contact us! There is currently a large display of vintage Girl Scout Dolls in the Mableton Service Center, downstairs next to the Resource Center and Archives Room. Feel free to stop and have a look!

District V Exhibit: First African American Girl Scouts in Atlanta

First African American Girl Scouts in Atlanta Exhibit

There is a new exhibit at the Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta Headquarters in Mableton, Georgia in honor of Black History Month. It is called “In The Lives of District V- The Untold Story of Atlanta’s  First African-American Girl Scout Troops.”

1940s Girl Scout uniform

The Greater Atlanta Chapter History/Archives committee features the stories from the first Atlanta African-American Girl Scout troops that began in 1943.  The showcase displays 25 items including photographs of Girl Scout memorabilia.  Pins and vintage uniforms pieces from the 1940 – 50’s reflect District V’s achievements in scouting. Part of the area covered by District V included the Auburn district of downtown Atlanta.

There are more than ten black and white photographs in the exhibit. Some are from The Atlanta Daily World newspaper and one is from a Jet Magazine photo shoot that featured 1953 Senior Girl Scout All State Camper, Roslyn Pope. Replicas of Miss Pope’s uniform with badges are also included.

Girl Scouts Thanks Badge

Miss Bazoline Usher in 1943 headed 25 to 30 African-American women to start troops for girls of color, which became District V.  Miss Usher worked many years with the Girl Scouts.  She received Girl Scouts’ highest honor, the “Thank You” pin, in the mid 1940’s.  The pin, also known as the Thanks Badge, is displayed along with Miss Usher’s photograph. There is a list of other honorees awarded this pin for their exceptional service that benefited the entire Girl Scout council.  It is a gold filled and enamel medallion on a blue grosgrain ribbon.

District V Girl Scout Troop counting out cookie profits

District V in their first year as Girl Scouts placed second in cookie sales in Atlanta.  A photograph from the The Atlanta Daily World depicts scouts and Troop Leader with cookie boxes and counting their profits.

Girl Scouts from District V were able to experience camp life at Camp J.K. Orr in Lovejoy, Georgia, which was rented from the Boy Scouts of America.  A brochure called Camping for me (1963) promotes District V’s first official campsite in Carver Park. The George Washington Carver State Park is the first Georgia state park for African-Americans.  Carver Park neighbors Girl Scout Camp Pine Acres on Lake Allatoona near Acworth. Some other artifacts include a sample size tent as well as a cookie case from the 1960s. A timeline which highlights the many historical events in Girl Scouts District V concludes the exhibit.

The exhibit is located in the Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta Service Center, available Monday through Friday from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm, and on weekends during events. Be sure and go see it while you are there! If you were a Girl Scout in District V, we would love to hear from you! Contact Margaret Paschal at 770-702-9411 or at mpaschal [at] gsgatl.org. [link not included to reduce spam]

Special thanks to Rhonda Barrow, Sue Belden, Denise McGill, Margaret Paschal and TaMara Powell for creating this educational and interesting exhibit.

Cookie Tins

Cookie Bank, undated

Girl Scout cookie tins are very popular, and are often sought by collectors. According to the Girl Scout Collector’s Guide (2005),

“Many vintage Girl Scout cookie tins and boxes exist. These early tins and boxes are often difficult to identify and date, however. The difficulty can be attributed to the fact that over the years a great number of bakers existed in many locations throughout the country.” (p. 457)

The Archives also has a tin from Byrd’s Cookie Company in Savannah, Georgia, depicting the Juliette Gordon Low Birthplace. We would love to hear from you about which tins you have in your collection!