Fall Sales Are Here!

fall sales 2014It’s time for Treats and Keeps! The Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta’s fall fundraiser is in full swing! As of September 2, you can now buy chocolates, nuts, magazines, and photo keepsakes from your local Atlanta area Girl Scouts.

Like the cookies, different areas of the country are supplied by different companies. For example, if Hot Cajun Crunch isn’t on an order form in one area of the country, then instead, there’s likely to be items like Island Fruit Mix, Peanut Brittle, or Mint Trefoils. Also, some councils offer magazine subscriptions while others are featuring photo keepsakes this year too.

As well as their annual fall fundraising, Girl Scouts have always been most well known for their annual cookie sale in the early spring of each year. But did you know that for decades now there have always been various sales year-round? For instance, during World War II, Girl Scouts sold war bonds (at no profit for GSUSA) to support the war effort here on the homefront. Also during WWII, they sold calendars instead of cookies because of the nationwide rationing of flour and sugar. To this day, calendars continue to be sold annually, though no longer in place of the beloved cookies.
war bonds

1940s calendars in the GSGATL Archives collections

1940s calendars in the GSGATL Archives collections

 

Recently, I found an image online of this wonderful vintage poster of a Girl Scouts salted nut sale. It looks like it is from either the 1940s or 1950s era. I would love to find more information about this poster! If anyone out there has any info, please leave a comment or message us at GirlScoutArchivesAtlanta@gmail.com!

Do you know more info about this poster? Let us know!

Do you know more info about this poster? Let us know!

Happy Labor Day, Everyone!

Labor Day was celebrated for the first time in New York City in 1882. It began as a state holiday, getting voted in by individual states, but gained popularity and was voted a national holiday by Congress in 1894.

Modern day Girl Scout parade float

Modern day Girl Scout parade float

Labor Day celebrates the achievements of the American work force with a national day off on the first Monday in September.

A time for relaxation with family and friends, Labor Day is a popular time for special events and festivals throughout the country such as cooking out, camping, and parades!

Girl Scout float, Randolph County, Ga. parade: 1958

Girl Scout float, Randolph County, Ga. parade: 1958

Labor Day is also a chance to bid farewell to summer with a long weekend, sometimes spent camping or swimming. Pictured below are Girl Scouts all decked out in their 1920s era bathing costumes, a far cry from the bathing suits of today!

Waycross, Ware County, Ga. 1923 at Girl Scout Hut

Waycross, Ware County, Ga. 1923 at Girl Scout Hut

What are your plans this Labor Day weekend? Here in the Greater Atlanta Area there are tons of events and festivals happening all weekend long. Click here to browse some of the activities that are going on, and keep your eye our for Girl Scouts while you’re out and about!

Retired History Badges

Everyone knows the saying, “Once a Girl Scout, always a Girl Scout,” right? Well, did you also know that “Once a badge, always a badge?” YES! If you can find the retired/discontinued badges that you want (think eBay, Etsy, or even back-stock at your local Badge and Sash store and/or council online stores), then you can earn them with your girls! This is wonderful news for us here in the Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta History and Archives Committee because that means that several awesome history-related badges that we thought were previously unavailable are now available again!

listening to the past

 

One badge is a Brownie try-it called “Listening to the Past.” We’ve made a blog post all about this badge and the requirements involved and if you’re interested, click here to read it.

Another badge for Juniors is called “Across Generations.” Girls must earn any six of the following ten requirements:

across generations

  1. These Are Their Lives
    Interview one or more older adults to find out about their lives. Ask them about dates, special events, or other important days that they remember. Create a painting, time line, or scrapbook showing these important experiences. Give it to the person you interviewed.
  2. Learn a New Skill
    Invite a person who is 70 years old or older and has a special hobby or skill to share it with your troop or family.
  3. Make A Friend
    Visit a person in a nursing home or senior center at least two times. Ask her about her live, share pictures from your life, teach her one of today’s songs or learn a song from her childhood.
  4. Be A Helper
    Find a way to assist an older person in your community. Help an older neighbor with her gardening, help a friend’s grandmother with chores, or read to someone whose eyesight is failing.
  5. Service Directory
    With your troop create a list of community agencies, schools, house of worship, or organizations that help older people. Contact each organization and find out if it allo2ws girls to volunteer. If it does, what commitment is required? Does the organization provide training? Compile this information in a directory. Work with your leader or another adult to make copies of the directory available for people who want to do service project.
  6. Girl Scouts Past and Present
    Find women in your community who were Girl Scouts from 1912 to 1950. Invite them to share their Girl Scout memories with you. What has stayed the same in Girl Scouting? What has changed?
  7. Share the Fun
    Visit a nursing home, retirement home, or senior citizen’s center. Participate in an activity such as singing or a game or craft session. Or create a special activity that you then share with a group of senior citizens.
  8. Love What You Do
    Invite an individual over the age of 65, who is active in her career, to come to your troop or group and discuss what has made her happy and successful in her work.
  9. What’s So Funny?
    Find out how humor has changed over the years. Look at cartoons or comic books from 20 or 30 years ago. Ask your local librarian to help you find them. Next, read the funnies in your local paper or your favorite comic book. What’s different? What’s the same?
  10. Food Through the Years
    Invite a senior citizen to do a cooking project with you. Prepare recipe she enjoyed as a youngster. Ask her how food preparation has changed. Are some ingredients that used to be easily available now hard to find? What new kitchen equipment has been invented that makes cooking much quicker and easier?

heritage hunt

Also for Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors there is a badge called “Heritage Hunt.” Like the above Brownie try-it, we’ve written a blog post about this badge before. Click here to check out the requirements!

These are just a few examples of the retired and/or discontinued history-related badges that can still be earned! There are plenty of others out there, all you have to do is a little searching. If you have any questions or need help with any of these badges, please contact us at GirlScoutArchivesAtlanta@gmail.com.

Girl Scout Dolls Through The Years

Dolls are a hugely popular collectible item and Girl Scout dolls are certainly no exception. In 1920, the first known commercially made Girl Scout doll was offered for sale through The American Girl, the official magazine of Girl Scouts, published from 1917 until 1979. Many different sizes and styles of Girl Scout dolls have been produced over the years: Brownie uniformed, Intermediate and Senior uniformed, and even adult or leader dolls; and although their popularity has waxed and waned throughout the decades, Girl Scout dolls are still going strong.

Girl Scout Dolls

Girl Scout dolls, circa 1950s, from the GSGATL Archives collection; each approx. 6-8″ tall

The official Girl Scout doll of today is made by Adora and is an 18” doll similar in style to the popular doll, American Girl (not to be confused with the Girl Scout publication, The American Girl). Many Girl Scout themed dolls and uniforms can be bought across the world, but only the official Adora doll licensed by Girl Scouts of USA (pictured below) can be found at your local council Badge and Sash Store  or through any council’s online store.

Adora Girl Scouts

The newest doll to officially join Girl Scouts as of July 2014 is fashion icon herself, Barbie! She wears the contemporary uniform of today’s girls: her sash and a crisp white shirt, but pink, rather than khaki bottoms. Hey, it’s Barbie… what would she do without her signature pink?

The Girl Scout Barbie doll is manufactured as a blonde, brunette, or African-American, as are most versions of the Barbie Doll, demonstrating how Barbie’s broad diversity is a perfect fit with the Girl Scouts of USA.

barbie scout

If you have any questions regarding Girl Scout dolls that we have in our collection at the GSGATL Archives, please don’t hesitate to contact us! There is currently a large display of vintage Girl Scout Dolls in the Mableton Service Center, downstairs next to the Resource Center and Archives Room. Feel free to stop and have a look!

GSGATL Volunteer Leadership Conference

#VLC2014

It starts with us!

This past weekend, on Saturday, August 9th, was the Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta Volunteer Leadership Conference. Where you there? We were! The GSGATL History and Archives Committee had a booth set up all day long sharing info and educating everyone about who we are and what we do! Everyone had a lot of fun spreading the word about what the Archives can do to help volunteers grow and strengthen their leadership experience.

The Volunteer Leadership Conference was held at the Cobb Galleria off of Cobb Parkway, near Marietta, Ga. It focused on learning experiences and how volunteers and leaders can make the most of their knowledge of Girl Scouting while facilitating the volunteers of tomorrow.

#VLC214

Volunteer Leadership Conference in the Cobb Galleria Ballroom

Archive committee members educated leaders about the many items we have in the collection that can help them and their troops complete programs and earn badges. For example, did you know that in the Archives we have resource boxes for each age level that will help you complete the history portion of the Girl Scout Way badge?

Resource boxes for every age level available in GSGATL Archives

Resource boxes for every age level available in GSGATL Archives

Linda Bishop, member of the GSGATL Archives Committee, at our booth at the Volunteer Leadership Conference

Linda Bishop, member of the GSGATL Archives Committee, at our booth at the Volunteer Leadership Conference

How has our Girl Scout Law changed over the years? Our uniform? Our ceremonies? Our songs? We can help you learn all about the traditions of our Girl Scout Sisters of the past and how they relate to Girl Scouts of today, then share your new found knowledge with your troop or other Girl Scout leaders and volunteers!

If you missed this year’s Conference, we welcome all of you to make some time to come by the Mableton Service Center and see what we have to offer for you and your Scouts!

Happy August, Everyone!

Did you know that August was National Picnic Month? And that August 4th was National Sisters Day? Sounds like the perfect recipe to have a fun, late summer picnic with some of your Girl Scout sisters! So let’s pull out that vintage Girl Scout mess kit and round up our troop for some good old fashioned, out-of-doors fun!

1941 Girl Scout camp postcard

1941 Girl Scout camp postcard

The 1953 Girl Scout Handbook had some pretty nifty ideas when it came to mealtime for girls. Here are a couple of fun examples:

“Avoid clashing colors, such as beets and carrots on a purple plate.”

“Do not repeat flavors or color in the same meal…”

”Combine soft foods, such as mashed potatoes or scrambled eggs, with something crisp and chewy, such as … fried foods.”

1953 handbook

And did you know that “butter and fortified margarine” was one of the seven basic food groups in 1953? That’s pretty amusing!

However, the handbook did suggest substituting the chocolate square in your s’more for a slice of pineapple… now that I have to try!

And don’t forget to include that good old get-to-know-you “Girl Scout Picnic Game.” You know the one- “My name is Mary.  I’m going on a Girl Scout picnic, and I’m taking marshmallows…” and so on. Instructions for this classic scouting introductions game can be found here.

Happy August, everyone!

GS Archives History Conference 2013

IMG_20110515_160429

1960 GSUSA National Convention framed photograph. From the collection of the Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta Archives.

By now, those of you on the Girl Scout History Listserv will have heard about the announcement from National:

The Girl Scout National Historic Preservation Center (NHPC) is pleased to announce that History Conference 2013 will take place at Edith Macy Conference Center (EMCC/Macy), Briar Cliff Manor, New York, from Monday, 9 September through Wednesday, 11 September 2013.

This conference is perfect for those starting or maintaining a GS Council Archives, and who have never been an archivist before. Be sure to mark your calendars and send someone from your Council to attend. It will be a great conference, and we will be posting more details as we have them.

Celebrating Girl Scout Week: Taking Stock of the Collection

ImageAt the Girl Scouts of Greater Atlanta Archives, we spent the week discussing many issues, as our monthly meeting was taking place the day after Girl Scout Week was complete (March 10-16, 2013). Today, we had a work day sorting posters in our collection and seeing what sorts of duplicates we might have. As in many Archives collections, we found posters that were great but also damaged through age as well as regular wear and tear.

How, might you ask, do these volunteers deal with such a problem? In the past, tape was often used to bind the edges (or middles) together. Today, there are products on the market labeled as “archives tape” or “framers tape.” What you want to remember is:

“Don’t DO anything that you can’t UNDO.”

Tape is tape–there are adhesive and chemicals involved. The special tapes have a lower amount of these than commercially available tape, but none of these are perfectly safe for long-term use.

So what can we do, you may ask? If the item is small enough, you may wish to encapsulate the item between two sheets of mylar. A great description of this process is on the State Archives of Florida site. However, if the item is very large, such as the posters in question, you may wish to store them flat in a large, oversize alkaline folder and try to handle as little as possible. If it is a popular item, have it scanned and make a “use copy” for researchers, volunteers, or exhibits.

If you have further questions about this topic, archives products, or vendors, we’ll be happy to help. We’d love to hear about your favorite Council poster!

The Golden Eaglet

Remembering District V

Ms. Dews, Rhonda B, and TaMara P

1940′s Camping gear

District V with friends and vintage coke bottles.

What a nostalgic setting to remember District V and honor their field representative,
Ms. Phyllis Dews. The Archives/History committee prepared the Sunday afternoon Tea at the Auburn Avenue Research library in Downtown Atlanta. The Tea’s location was significant to the troop’s beginnings. Their second office was only four buildings down at 143 1/2 Auburn Avenue in 1945 on the second floor of the former Poinciana club. Music from the by-gone era played softly, Billie Holiday’s “God Bless the child,” Jackie Wilson’s “Lonely Teardrops,” and Martha & the Vandellas’ “Quicksand” to name a few. Round tables draped with white linen with whimsical retro Girl Scout centerpieces decorated the intimate affair. When the honored guest arrived, everyone stood and applauded. As she took her seat, she said, you all have really done it.

The celebration continued to the next phase onto the third floor for the Community panel discussion, which was open to the public. A second installment of “The District V” exhibit greeted visitors in the room: vintage Girl Scouts Handbooks, Camping Gear, Black and White snapshots including a Girl Scouts founder, Juliette “Daisy” Low portrait. Campfire songs and a short silent video featuring Bazoline Usher played as people filled the room. There was not an empty seat.

The introductions were given by the library programs director, Morris Gardner. Short presentations given by the Greater Atlanta Girl Scout council, Brenda S. and Archives/History committee, Linda B.
The three member panel included former scouts, Dr. Roslyn Pope, Mrs. Celestine Bray Bottoms, and Ms. Phyllis Dews. Senior Ambassador Scout of Troop 1368, Arianna served as moderator for the discussion. Each panel member answered questions on camping, cookie sales, and obstacles being the first black troops in Atlanta.
Ms. Dews explained the challenges of the times. She described how on first her camping experience with 50 scouts at Camp J.K. Orr in Lovejoy, they were confronted by a rogue group of white men with guns asking where was the integrated campgrounds. Their camp director was white. The men escorted her off the grounds. Ms. Dews said she pondered all through the night about the camp director’s well being and how she had promised the scouts’ parents their daughters would be safe.
Mrs. Bottoms candidly remembered hayrides and a traditional camping treat. She explained I was a city girl and had never been on a hayride. She added we made S’mores with Oh, Henry candy bars. “Our S’mores had nuts,” she exclaimed.
Dr. Pope described how she became Georgia’s Girl Scouts All State camper in 1953. I don’t think Alaska and Hawaii were states at the time she began. But she went to say everyone marveled how I represented Georgia, the only Negro at the All States event in Wyoming.
A young former scout asked did you all sell cookies like we do now. The three answered no. But their fellow scout sitting in the audience said,”Yes, we sold cookies.” She also named every member from their troop.
In closing we pinned each panel guest with a 100 year Girl Scout pin given by council and awarded them a certificate of appreciation from the “Friends of the Auburn Ave Library.” Girl Scout council member, Mary F. removed her very own Girl Scout scarf that she wore to give to Ms. Dews – Girl Scout sisterhood.

If you would like the view the first installment of “The Lives of District V : The untold story of Atlanta ‘s first African-American Girl Scout Troops,” please visit the Greater Atlanta Girl Scouts Headquarters at 1560 N. Allen Rd. in Mableton from 10 – 6 pm Monday – Friday.
We thank “The Atlanta Daily World” for covering District V. Without their reporting; District V’s story would truly be untold.

Link to the video stream of discussion.

http://ahref=
<br /><a href=”http://www.ustream.tv/” style=”padding: 2px 0px 4px; width: 400px; background: #ffffff; display: block; color: #000000; font-weight: normal; font-size: 10px; text-decoration: underline; text-align: center;” target=”_blank”>Video streaming by Ustream</a>

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